Research Areas

About Us

Physiology and Neurobiology is a multidisciplinary research department at the University of Connecticut. Our mission is to promote research and education that is innovative, collaborative, and centered on cutting-edge science. The department promotes this goal by bringing together researchers and educators focused on the molecular, cellular, and circuit-based mechanisms that underlie diverse functions orchestrated by the brain and body. By integrating work across the spectrum of Physiology and Neurobiology, we aim to advance our understanding of brain-body functions and interactions under normal conditions and disease.

Molecular & Cellular Physiology

This research focuses on the basic cellular mechanisms (e.g., intracellular signaling, gene regulation, protein interactions) that underlie neural circuit and synaptic functions, heterogeneity within classical cell types, ion channel physiology, cardio-respiratory physiology, sensory receptor signaling, reproduction, and endocrinology. Scientific questions of interest are interrogated using several model systems in combination with diverse technical approaches.

Investigative Tools

  • Advanced imaging
  • Patch-clamp electrophysiology
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Anatomical studies
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization
  • qRT-PCR

Conover Lab

Joanne Conover photo

Email:

joanne.conover@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-8338

Lab Website:

Conover Lab

Dr. Joanne Conover

Professor

Lab Focus

Neuroepithelial Stem Cell Lineage Tracking | Neuroblast Migratory Pathways | Aging, Injury and Repair

"Our research focuses on developmental neurobiology and stem cell biology with an emphasis on understanding neural stem cell distribution, maintenance, and function in the brain as well as applications of stem cell biology in the treatment of Hydrocephalus and other developmental disorders."

Jackson Lab

Alexander Jackson photo

Email:

alexander.jackson@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-9032

Lab Website:

Jackson Lab

Dr. Alexander Jackson

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Cellular and Synaptic Neurophysiology of Hypothalamic Neural Circuits | Heterogeneity of LHA Functional Subpopulations

"Research in our lab is focused on the cellular and synaptic neurophysiology of hypothalamic neural circuits that regulate fundamental behavioral states such as sleep, arousal and feeding. In particular, we study cells and circuits in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), which orchestrates fundamental aspects of behavior including arousal, stress, feeding and motivated behavior."

Kanadia Lab

Rahul Kanadia photo

Email:

rahul.kanadia@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-8947

Office:

TLS 121

Lab Website:

Kanadia Lab

Dr. Rahul Kanadia

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation | Role of Minor Spliceosome in Development and Disease

"Our long-term objective is to understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in embryonic development and disease pathogenesis. Specifically, we focus on understanding the role of the minor spliceosome, which is responsible for the splicing of a rare type of intron called the U12-type or minor intron."

LoTurco Lab

Joseph LoTurco photo

Email:

joseph.loturco@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-3283

Office:

PBB 125A

Lab Website:

LoTurco Lab

Dr. Joseph LoTurco

Professor

Lab Focus

Development of the Neocortex | CRISPR Models of Pediatric Glioma

"Research in our lab focuses on how and why disruptions in development alter the physiology of neurons and astrocytes in Cerebral Neocortex, and how such alterations cause pathologies in the developing brain. We have a particular interest in the impact of somatic mutations on the physiology of neurons and circuits in the developing neocortex."

Menuz Lab

Karen Menuz photo

Email:

karen.menuz@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-3017

Office:

TLS 119

Lab Website:

Menuz Lab

Dr. Karen Menuz

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Chemosensation in Insects | Olfactory Signaling in Drosophila

"Our lab studies the cellular and molecular basis of chemosensation in insects. Our research aims to provide insight into fundamental principles of sensory neuroscience by addressing questions regarding the mechanisms underlying olfactory neuron physiology and behavior. Knowing that insect vectors of disease often rely on olfaction to detect their human hosts, our work is also motivated by the goal of identifying targets for the development of novel insect repellents."

Mulkey Lab

Dan Mulkey photo

Email:

daniel.mulkey@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-5572

Office:

TLS 122

Lab Website:

Mulkey Lab

Dr. Daniel Mulkey

Professor and Associate Department Head

Lab Focus

Autonomic Control of Breathing | Neuron-Astrocyte-Vascular Coupling

"Our research is centered in understanding the electrophysiological characteristics of mammalian neurons in brainstem regions associated with cardiorespiratory control. We are currently using a combination of slice-patch electrophysiology, fluorescent imaging and genetic approaches to identify ion channels that regulate activity and neurotransmitter modulation of neurons that provide the CO2/H+-dependent drive to breathe (i.e., respiratory chemoreceptors)."

Nishiyama Lab

Akiko Nishiyama photo

Email:

akiko.nishiyama@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-4561

Office:

PBB 631

Lab Website:

Nishiyama Lab

Dr. Akiko Nishiyama

Professor and Department Head

Lab Focus

Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Dynamics and Fate Mapping | Glia in Health and Disease

"Our research focuses on molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterogeneity and lineage plasticity of NG2 glial cells (also known as polydendrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells) and neuron-glial interactions in normal development and in lesion repair. Techniques used in the lab include mouse genetics combined with immunohistochemistry, tissue culture, fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and biochemical and molecular biological techniques including RNA-sequencing and ChIP sequencing."

Sciolino Lab

Natale Sciolino photo

Email:

natale.sciolino@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-2550

Office:

TLS 114

Lab Website:

Sciolino Lab

Dr. Natale Sciolino

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Neural Circuitry of Motivated Behaviors | Role of Locus Coeruleus Neurons in Feeding

"Our research focuses on defining the connectivity and function of brain circuits that regulate motivational processes related to feeding and reward. We utilize intersectional genetic and optical imaging approaches with the goal to provide future treatments for obesity and psychiatric disorders, such as addiction and anxiety."

Sun Lab

Jianjun Sun photo

Email:

jianjun.sun@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-4666

Lab Website:

Sun Lab

Dr. Jianjun Sun

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Reproductive Physiology and Ovarian Cancer | Secretory Cell Differentiation

"Research in the laboratory focuses on reproductive physiology and ovarian cancer. Powerful genetic tools in Drosophila will be applied to decipher the formation and physiological function of the secretory cells in the female reproductive tract, the cells of origin of ovarian cancer."

Tanner Lab

Geoffrey Tanner photo

Email:

geoffrey.tanner@uconn.edu

Office:

TLS 19

Dr. Geoffrey Tanner

Assistant Professor-in-Residence

Lab Focus

Nutrition/Diet and Neurological Disease | Drosophila Model for Neuropathology

"Our group is interested in the connection between diet and the progression of neuropathological conditions. Using Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies as a model system, our group studies specifically how caloric restriction, or diets that mimic caloric restriction (particularly the ketogenic diet), may prevent onset—or ameliorate symptoms—of prevalent neuropathies in fly models of diseases such as epilepsy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and Alzheimer’s disease."

Tzingounis Lab

Anastasios Tzingounis photo

Email:

anastasios.tzingounis@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860)486-7916

Office:

PBB 111

Lab Website:

Tzingounis Lab

Dr. Anastasios Tzingounis

Professor

Lab Focus

Molecular and Cellular Physiology of Epilepsy-Associated Genes | KCNQ Channels in the Brain

"Our interest is to reveal the mechanisms by which epilepsy-associated molecules and signaling networks lead to epileptogenesis in the neonatal and infantile brain. In the current genomic era, gene mutations are identified in pediatric patients with increasing frequency, but it is unclear how the myriad of identified proteins and signaling networks are organized to regulate neuronal excitability."

Walikonis Lab

Randall Walikonis photo

Email:

randall.walikonis@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-9031

Lab Website:

Walikonis Lab

Dr. Randall Walikonis

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies

Lab Focus

Postsynaptic Signal Transduction Systems | Novel Protein Identification

"Our research is focused on the identification and characterization of proteins found at the postsynaptic density (PSD), a structure at the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory glutamatergic synapses at the tips of dendritic spines. The PSD contains proteins that organize the glutamate receptors, transduce signals initiated by receptors, promote adhesion between the postsynaptic and presynaptic membranes, and modify the synapse in response to neurological activity."

Yu Lab

Jianzhong Yu photo

Email:

jianzhong.yu@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-5440

Office:

TLS 110A

Lab Website:

Yu Lab

Dr. Jianzhong Yu

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Organ Size Control and Tumorigenesis | Therapeutic Targets for Parkinson's Disease

"Our lab has two major research directions. 1) Basic research of cancer biology, with the aim of understanding the molecular mechanisms of organ size control and tumorigenesis. 2) Aging and neurodegenerative diseases, specifically molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson’s disease (PD)."

Circuit & Behavioral Neuroscience

The goal of this research is to uncover the cell types, circuits, neurotransmitters, and receptor signaling mechanisms that underlie adaptive and maladaptive behavior. Current research strengths include the neural basis of motivated behavior, emotion regulation, learning and memory, sensory, motor and respiratory processing, reward and addiction, gene and environment interactions, as well as the neural substrates of metabolic, neurological and psychiatric disease.

Investigative Tools

  • Neural tract-tracing
  • In-vivo calcium imaging
  • Fiber photometry
  • Optogenetics and chemogenetics
  • Electron microscopy
  • Viral and intersectional genetics
  • Input-output connectivity mapping
  • Behavioral assays

Jackson Lab

Alexander Jackson photo

Email:

alexander.jackson@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-9032

Lab Website:

Jackson Lab

Dr. Alexander Jackson

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Cellular and Synaptic Neurophysiology of Hypothalamic Neural Circuits | Heterogeneity of LHA Functional Subpopulations

"Research in our lab is focused on the cellular and synaptic neurophysiology of hypothalamic neural circuits that regulate fundamental behavioral states such as sleep, arousal and feeding. In particular, we study cells and circuits in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), which orchestrates fundamental aspects of behavior including arousal, stress, feeding and motivated behavior."

Ostroff Lab

Linnaea Ostroffphoto

Email:

linnaea.ostroff@uconn.edu

Lab Website:

Ostroff Lab

Dr. Linnaea Ostroff

Assistant Professor and Faculty Director of Bioscience Electron Microscopy Laboratory

Lab Focus

Neuroatonomical Basis of Learning and Memory | 3D Electron Microscopy Reconstructions of Synapses

"Our lab is interested in the neuroanatomical basis of learning and memory, and specifically how synaptic circuits are reorganized when emotional memories are formed. Memories of safety can suppress fear, anxiety, and stress responses, and understanding how they are encoded at the cellular level can shed light on the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. We use serial section electron microscopy reconstructions to study changes in synaptic connectivity, along with immuno-electron microscopy, behavioral pharmacology, and viral vector based neuroanatomical tracing."

Moiseff Lab

Andrew Moiseff photo

Email:

andrew.moiseff@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-2713

Office:

AUST 401

Dr. Andrew Moiseff

Professor and Associate Dean for Behavioral and Life Sciences

Lab Focus

Synchronous Flashing of Fireflies | Neuroethological Approach to Information Processing

"Our laboratory is currently focused on the study of synchronous flashing by fireflies. Studying synchrony gives us insights into how behavioral and neural systems evolve unique solutions to unique problems. Our long-term goal is to understand general principles of signal processing and how the brain is organized to enable neurons to carry out complex tasks."

Mulkey Lab

Dan Mulkey photo

Email:

daniel.mulkey@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-5572

Office:

TLS 122

Lab Website:

Mulkey Lab

Dr. Daniel Mulkey

Professor and Associate Department Head

Lab Focus

Autonomic Control of Breathing | Neuron-Astrocyte-Vascular Coupling

"Our research is centered in understanding the electrophysiological characteristics of mammalian neurons in brainstem regions associated with cardiorespiratory control. We are currently using a combination of slice-patch electrophysiology, fluorescent imaging and genetic approaches to identify ion channels that regulate activity and neurotransmitter modulation of neurons that provide the CO2/H+-dependent drive to breathe (i.e., respiratory chemoreceptors)."

Sciolino Lab

Natale Sciolino photo

Email:

natale.sciolino@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-2550

Office:

TLS 114

Lab Website:

Sciolino Lab

Dr. Natale Sciolino

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Neural Circuitry of Motivated Behaviors | Role of Locus Coeruleus Neurons in Feeding

"Our research focuses on defining the connectivity and function of brain circuits that regulate motivational processes related to feeding and reward. We utilize intersectional genetic and optical imaging approaches with the goal to provide future treatments for obesity and psychiatric disorders, such as addiction and anxiety."

Tanner Lab

Geoffrey Tanner photo

Email:

geoffrey.tanner@uconn.edu

Office:

TLS 19

Dr. Geoffrey Tanner

Assistant Professor-in-Residence

Lab Focus

Nutrition/Diet and Neurological Disease | Drosophila Model for Neuropathology

"Our group is interested in the connection between diet and the progression of neuropathological conditions. Using Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies as a model system, our group studies specifically how caloric restriction, or diets that mimic caloric restriction (particularly the ketogenic diet), may prevent onset—or ameliorate symptoms—of prevalent neuropathies in fly models of diseases such as epilepsy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and Alzheimer’s disease."

Development, Disease & Tissue Repair

Research in this area is directed towards understanding molecular mechanisms required for normal development and maintenance of diverse cell types, how disruption of signaling pathways contributes to disease, and how targeting these pathways may offer therapeutic potential for disease prevention and treatment.

Investigative Tools

  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Stem cell biology
  • BrdU and EdU pulsing
  • Chromatin analysis
  • TUNEL assay
  • Proteomics

Conover Lab

Joanne Conover photo

Email:

joanne.conover@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-8338

Lab Website:

Conover Lab

Dr. Joanne Conover

Professor

Lab Focus

Neuroepithelial Stem Cell Lineage Tracking | Neuroblast Migratory Pathways | Aging, Injury and Repair

"Our research focuses on developmental neurobiology and stem cell biology with an emphasis on understanding neural stem cell distribution, maintenance, and function in the brain as well as applications of stem cell biology in the treatment of Hydrocephalus and other developmental disorders."

Kanadia Lab

Rahul Kanadia photo

Email:

rahul.kanadia@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-8947

Office:

TLS 121

Lab Website:

Kanadia Lab

Dr. Rahul Kanadia

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation | Role of Minor Spliceosome in Development and Disease

"Our long-term objective is to understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in embryonic development and disease pathogenesis. Specifically, we focus on understanding the role of the minor spliceosome, which is responsible for the splicing of a rare type of intron called the U12-type or minor intron."

LoTurco Lab

Joseph LoTurco photo

Email:

joseph.loturco@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-3283

Office:

PBB 125A

Lab Website:

LoTurco Lab

Dr. Joseph LoTurco

Professor

Lab Focus

Development of the Neocortex | CRISPR Models of Pediatric Glioma

"Research in our lab focuses on how and why disruptions in development alter the physiology of neurons and astrocytes in Cerebral Neocortex, and how such alterations cause pathologies in the developing brain. We have a particular interest in the impact of somatic mutations on the physiology of neurons and circuits in the developing neocortex."

Nishiyama Lab

Akiko Nishiyama photo

Email:

akiko.nishiyama@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-4561

Office:

PBB 631

Lab Website:

Nishiyama Lab

Dr. Akiko Nishiyama

Professor and Department Head

Lab Focus

Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Dynamics and Fate Mapping | Glia in Health and Disease

"Our research focuses on molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterogeneity and lineage plasticity of NG2 glial cells (also known as polydendrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells) and neuron-glial interactions in normal development and in lesion repair. Techniques used in the lab include mouse genetics combined with immunohistochemistry, tissue culture, fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and biochemical and molecular biological techniques including RNA-sequencing and ChIP sequencing."

Sun Lab

Jianjun Sun photo

Email:

jianjun.sun@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-4666

Lab Website:

Sun Lab

Dr. Jianjun Sun

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Reproductive Physiology and Ovarian Cancer | Secretory Cell Differentiation

"Research in the laboratory focuses on reproductive physiology and ovarian cancer. Powerful genetic tools in Drosophila will be applied to decipher the formation and physiological function of the secretory cells in the female reproductive tract, the cells of origin of ovarian cancer."

Tzingounis Lab

Anastasios Tzingounis photo

Email:

anastasios.tzingounis@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860)486-7916

Office:

PBB 111

Lab Website:

Tzingounis Lab

Dr. Anastasios Tzingounis

Professor

Lab Focus

Molecular and Cellular Physiology of Epilepsy-Associated Genes | KCNQ Channels in the Brain

"Our interest is to reveal the mechanisms by which epilepsy-associated molecules and signaling networks lead to epileptogenesis in the neonatal and infantile brain. In the current genomic era, gene mutations are identified in pediatric patients with increasing frequency, but it is unclear how the myriad of identified proteins and signaling networks are organized to regulate neuronal excitability."

Yu Lab

Jianzhong Yu photo

Email:

jianzhong.yu@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-5440

Office:

TLS 110A

Lab Website:

Yu Lab

Dr. Jianzhong Yu

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Organ Size Control and Tumorigenesis | Therapeutic Targets for Parkinson's Disease

"Our lab has two major research directions. 1) Basic research of cancer biology, with the aim of understanding the molecular mechanisms of organ size control and tumorigenesis. 2) Aging and neurodegenerative diseases, specifically molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson’s disease (PD)."

Genetics & Genomics

Genetic research and tools are fundamental in many of the research projects across the PNB department. Genetic regulation allows cells to adapt to their environment and its disruption is a hallmark of many neurological diseases. Current genetic research in the department aims to understand the role of genes in diverse topics including: spliceasome regulation, mapping heterogeneity in cell-types, and modeling of Parkinson's disease in Drosophila.

Investigative Tools

  • Optogenetics
  • RNAseq / ChIPseq / ATACseq
  • Intersectional genetics
  • scRNA-seq
  • Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
  • Chemogenetics

Jackson Lab

Alexander Jackson photo

Email:

alexander.jackson@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-9032

Lab Website:

Jackson Lab

Dr. Alexander Jackson

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Cellular and Synaptic Neurophysiology of Hypothalamic Neural Circuits | Heterogeneity of LHA Functional Subpopulations

"Research in our lab is focused on the cellular and synaptic neurophysiology of hypothalamic neural circuits that regulate fundamental behavioral states such as sleep, arousal and feeding. In particular, we study cells and circuits in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), which orchestrates fundamental aspects of behavior including arousal, stress, feeding and motivated behavior."

Kanadia Lab

Rahul Kanadia photo

Email:

rahul.kanadia@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-8947

Office:

TLS 121

Lab Website:

Kanadia Lab

Dr. Rahul Kanadia

Associate Professor

Lab Focus

Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation | Role of Minor Spliceosome in Development and Disease

"Our long-term objective is to understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in embryonic development and disease pathogenesis. Specifically, we focus on understanding the role of the minor spliceosome, which is responsible for the splicing of a rare type of intron called the U12-type or minor intron."

Menuz Lab

Karen Menuz photo

Email:

karen.menuz@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-3017

Office:

TLS 119

Lab Website:

Menuz Lab

Dr. Karen Menuz

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Chemosensation in Insects | Olfactory Signaling in Drosophila

"Our lab studies the cellular and molecular basis of chemosensation in insects. Our research aims to provide insight into fundamental principles of sensory neuroscience by addressing questions regarding the mechanisms underlying olfactory neuron physiology and behavior. Knowing that insect vectors of disease often rely on olfaction to detect their human hosts, our work is also motivated by the goal of identifying targets for the development of novel insect repellents."

Nishiyama Lab

Akiko Nishiyama photo

Email:

akiko.nishiyama@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-4561

Office:

PBB 631

Lab Website:

Nishiyama Lab

Dr. Akiko Nishiyama

Professor and Department Head

Lab Focus

Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Dynamics and Fate Mapping | Glia in Health and Disease

"Our research focuses on molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterogeneity and lineage plasticity of NG2 glial cells (also known as polydendrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells) and neuron-glial interactions in normal development and in lesion repair. Techniques used in the lab include mouse genetics combined with immunohistochemistry, tissue culture, fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and biochemical and molecular biological techniques including RNA-sequencing and ChIP sequencing."

Sciolino Lab

Natale Sciolino photo

Email:

natale.sciolino@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-2550

Office:

TLS 114

Lab Website:

Sciolino Lab

Dr. Natale Sciolino

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Neural Circuitry of Motivated Behaviors | Role of Locus Coeruleus Neurons in Feeding

"Our research focuses on defining the connectivity and function of brain circuits that regulate motivational processes related to feeding and reward. We utilize intersectional genetic and optical imaging approaches with the goal to provide future treatments for obesity and psychiatric disorders, such as addiction and anxiety."

Schwartz Lab

Daniel Schwartz photo

Email:

daniel.schwartz@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-0496

Lab Website:

Schwartz Lab

Dr. Daniel Schwartz

Associate Professor and Director of COR²E

Lab Focus

Short Linear Protein Motifs | Development of Bioinformatic Programs

"Our Research is focused on computational and experimental techniques to discover, catalog, and functionally understand short linear protein motifs. Specific projects include: i) the continued improvement of the motif-x and scan-x web-tools, ii) the development of experimental methodologies to uncover kinase motifs, and iii) the analysis of motif signatures on viral protein primary structure toward the goal of elucidating mechanisms of viral propagation and developing therapeutic agents."

Yu Lab

Jianzhong Yu photo

Email:

jianzhong.yu@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-5440

Office:

TLS 110A

Lab Website:

Yu Lab

Dr. Jianzhong Yu

Assistant Professor

Lab Focus

Organ Size Control and Tumorigenesis | Therapeutic Targets for Parkinson's Disease

"Our lab has two major research directions. 1) Basic research of cancer biology, with the aim of understanding the molecular mechanisms of organ size control and tumorigenesis. 2) Aging and neurodegenerative diseases, specifically molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson’s disease (PD)."

Biology Education Research

This research seeks to advance our understanding of teaching and learning effectiveness in Biology education. Specific research questions include inclusive teaching and learning practices, roles of students in active learning settings, and best practices to promote institutional change.

Dr. Xinnian Chen

Xinnian Chen photo

Email:

xinnian.chen@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-6169

Office:

TLS 112

Dr. Xinnian Chen

Assistant Professor-in-Residence and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Research Focus

"Our research focuses on the processes involved in the implementation of evidence-based inclusive teaching (EBT) practices in higher education. Currently, we are studying the eco-system that influences faculty adoption of EBT and factors that affect student learning outcomes."

Dr. John Redden

John Redden photo

Email:

john.redden@uconn.edu

Phone:

(860) 486-1045

Office:

TLS 167

Dr. John Redden

Assistant Professor-in-Residence

Research Focus

"As a discipline based educational researcher, I am focused on designing and assessing student centered Physiology classrooms, creating successful peer to peer learning and mentoring networks, and training undergraduates to be effective science communicators."

Dr. Geoffrey Tanner

Geoffrey Tanner photo

Email:

geoffrey.tanner@uconn.edu

Office:

TLS 19

Dr. Geoffrey Tanner

Assistant Professor-in-Residence

Research Focus

"My educational research involves developing mechanisms for improving student learning of core concepts in large-enrollment physiology classrooms."